Lindsey’s Page

Work in Progress

I am now deep in writing the fourth Albia book, whereof I could tell you the title if my editors would just cave in and agree I am right… I am behind schedule. Hmm…
I am bracing for the book tour on The Garden of the Hesperides, so I have been reminding myself what it is about. A copy has arrived and the moment I open it, I know I shall see a typo and perhaps an incorrect fact.

This brings me to a painful subject. People get so angry about what they perceive as mistakes, sometimes when they are right, though also when they are not. I am a calm and contained person now I am older, so I don’t get angry but I do feel sad that all they can see (in a book I have laboured to make enjoyable) is the errors. So I have had a new Rant.

Readers choices We still need readers’ favourite lines for any of the Albia books, including Spooky, so do send suggestions if you would like to.

Future Work

I have vague plans. It would be premature to mention them.

Contract News

There is more good news. In addition to Spain, Italy and the Czech Republic which I told you about previously, I am delighted that in Turkey Alfa Yayinlari have agreed to publish the first three of the Albia series.

Classical Association

In 1997/8 I was Honorary President of the UK Classical Association. I recommend joining if you are interested in the jolly side of classics. See their website,www.classicalassociation.org.

Organ Donor Card Appeal

This is a personal appeal on an issue where I have experience from both sides.

Please carry a donor card. And if ever you are in the sad position of having to decide whether to agree to organ donation from someone close to you, please consider the good you may do. Honour their wishes if they carry a card. If not, then it is your choice; please use the opportunity. I understand just how hard it is at the time – but I can also tell you, because I have had to do it, that afterwards you will feel glad you took the decision to say yes.

Lives can be saved or dramatically improved by organ transplants. From childhood, I had a rare eye condition called keratoconus. Eventually I needed a corneal transplant – not often mentioned when organ donation is discussed, though in fact one donor can save the sight of two people. Being able to see, without discomfort, helps me to write. A stranger’s generosity freed me from years of pain and anxiety. I was never able to thank my donor or their relatives, but I shall always remember them. Every time you read one of my books, you too are a beneficiary of their gift to me.